productivity

Juggling multiple projects and leveraging org-projectile

Scimax has a convenient feature of immediately creating projects (M-x nb-new). The location of the project directory is defined by the setting (setq nb-notebook-directory "~/my_projects/"), which has to be set in your Emacs config. Once the name of the project is chosen, a Readme.org buffer is immediately opened and one can start right away. It is an awesome, friction-free method to get started with a project. These projects are automatically initialised as git repositories, to which it is trivial to add a new remote using Magit.

Iosevka - an awesome font for Emacs

Before my foray into Emacs, I purchased applications like IAWriter (classic)1, Marked2, Texts (cross platform Mac/Windows), and have also tried almost all the recommended apps for longer form writing. I am a fan of zen writing apps. In particular the font and environment provided by IAWriter are conducive to focused writing. There also exist apps like Hemingway that also help check the quality of your writing. Zen writing apps are called so because they have a unique combination of fonts, background color, including line spacing and overall text-width - all of which enable a streamlined and focused flow of words onto the screen.

Emacs notes: Select paragraph and browse-kill-ring for effective content capture

I like to have any reading material and my notes side by side1. This is easily done with Emacs by splitting the buffer vertically (C-x 3)2 For example: Once a link has been opened via w3m, I hit org-capture (C-c) with a preset template that grabs the URL to the article along with the created date in the properties, with the cursor in position ready to take notes. (setq org-capture-templates '(("l" "Link + notes" entry (file+headline "~/my_org/link_database.

An SSD can breathe life into old computers

It’s a well known trick that installing a SSD in place of the conventional Hard disk can breathe new life into very old machines. My mid 2010 Macbook Pro is one such example, being over 8 years old. In particular, within Emacs - mu4e responds much more quickly and there is significantly less lag in searching / accessing emails and HTML rendering. The other advantage of using a Mac over Linux is that installation and setup instructions are more often available out the box for the Mac OS (though this is changing).

Switching from Evernote to DEVONtechnologies products

I’ve used Evernote since 2014, with over 3k notes of all kinds stored in it. Though I did try to capture everything of interest - the procedure was never fast or streamlined enough for me. The Evernote app runs ridiculously slower on older phones. In particular, being used to the speed of Emacs and Org mode - I was mostly displeased with the Evernote Mac / Windows apps as well.

Back to RSS

Why use RSS? Off late, I had been relying more on email based content consumption. The phenomenally fast search and filtering capabilities that can be leveraged with mu4e make this easy. However, even with all these filters, it is quite difficult to keep on top of news from different sources. At times it is inconvenient to mix important emails and correspondence with newsletters and the like, which arrive by the dozen(s) everyday.

Searching the awesome-lists on Github

Discovered the glorious awesome lists today on Github. They are available through a simple search on github, and contain curated lists of resources of all kinds on a multitude of topics. As one might expect, there is a lot of common ground between these lists, including topics and links. How could one search for a keyword through all these repositories? I have always wanted search for particular keywords or code snippets in my Emacs configuration files, or in other files in a particular location.

Getting productive - an exploration into holistic task management

Introduction To integrate tasks, reminders, notes, coding workflow into a single framework is no easy challenge. Org mode and Emacs help you do just that. After trying out several tools, IMHO : Todoist offers the best bang for your buck, especially with it’s natural language parsing ability, smooth and reliable sync as well as its multi-platform availability. Many describe Omnifocus to be the king of task management tools, with dedicated apps for different purposes and probably well integrated.